Dr Paolo Ruffino has published a new monograph: Future Gaming: Creative Interventions in Video Game Culture (Goldsmiths Press, distributed by MIT Press).

Considering game culture, from the gamification of self-improvement to GamerGate’s sexism and violence, Ruffino lays out an alternative, creative mode of thinking about the medium: a sophisticated critical take that blurs the distinctions among studying, playing, making and living with video games. Offering a series of stories that provide alternative narratives of digital gaming, Ruffino aims to encourage all of us who study and play (with) games to raise ethical questions, both about our own role in shaping the objects of research, and about our involvement in the discourses we produce as gamers and scholars.

Ruffino has presented his work at The Talks at Google. Here you can find a video of his presentation:

We are most happy to announce that PhD student Kieran Hicks has had his paper Good Game Feel: An Empirically Grounded Framework for Juicy Design accepted for presentation at DiGRA in Turin, July 2018. Congratulations Kieran!

The Games Reading Group will continue in the 2016/17 academic year. Our first meeting is on Thursday, December 8th from 13:00 to 14:00. As usual, we will explore topics around Human-Computer Interaction, Games Studies, and wider Games Research.

If you are a (staff or student member) of the University and would like to know more and/or join the group, please contact Kathrin Gerling.

We’re happy to announce that the Lincoln Games Lab is co-organizing a workshop at the first joint conference of DiGRA and FDG focusing on digital games for older adults. The workshop will address issues around game development for older audiences:

Previous assessments of digital games for the older adult market have focused on their use as a tool to promote aspects of well-being – e.g., fostering social interaction and providing cognitive and physical stimulation. This perspective suggests that the primary means of these games are to encourage older adults to better themselves, which introduces an overly functionalist perspective on play.

In this workshop, we aim to shift this perspectives on games for older adults by highlighting the hedonic and eudaimonic value that they offer. To do so, we will explore challenges and opportunities in the design and development of market-specific games to create empowering and engaging experiences.

The conference takes place in Dundee, Scotland; the workshop will run on Monday, August 1st 2016. For more information including submission details, please visit the workshop website.